A new method to combat antibiotic resistance; a way to use computer science to limit misinformation; and a plan to better understand the impacts of land use and climate change on flooding are among 19 projects awarded Innovation Research Grants this year through the School of Engineering and Applied Science.
Graduate alumna Jean W. Tom *93 has been elected into the National Academy of Engineering, considered one of the highest distinctions for engineers across disciplines.
“What is the engineer’s responsibility?” asked Benziger, a professor of chemical and biological engineering. That was the central question, one that Benziger would return to repeatedly in his course “Ethics and Technology: Engineering in the Real World.”
Michele L. Sarazen has been appointed assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering, bringing a focus on new ways to harness traditional methods for a clean-energy future.
Slimy, hard-to-clean bacterial mats called biofilms cause problems ranging from medical infections to clogged drains and fouled industrial equipment. Now, researchers at Princeton have found a way to cleanly and completely peel off these notorious sludges.
Creating new tools that harness light to probe the mysteries of cellular behavior, Princeton researchers have made discoveries about the formation of cellular components called membraneless organelles and the key role these organelles play in cells.
First-year graduate student José de Jesús Montaño López has received Mexico's 2018 National Youth Award, the highest honor given by the government to its citizens under 30 years old.
Graduate alumna Jean W. Tom was recognized with the 2018 Industry Leadership Award at the annual meeting of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.
The Research & Development Council of New Jersey honored Princeton's Robert K. Prud'homme, professor of chemical and biological engineering, along with 14 other area inventors, with the 2018 Edison Patent Award.
Popping the top on house paint usually draws people to look inside the can. But Princeton researchers have turned their gaze upward, to the underside of the lid, where it turns out that pattern of droplets could inspire new ways to make microscopically small structures.

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