In the middle of the career fair floor, as I talk with a recruiter, we are distracted by a young boy with a hard hat climbing atop the red display bicycle. We stop talking and the recruiter, a woman named Tiffany from Unilever, looks over and asks his mother if she can take a picture. She takes the picture as he poses and pretends to ride the...

Students in the course “Laboratory Techniques in Materials Science and Engineering” (MSE 302) are learning how to use large and sophisticated pieces of equipment to probe materials that are several times smaller than the width of a human hair.
Graduate alumnus Yogesh Goyal has been named to the inaugural class of Schmidt Science Fellows, a postdoctoral program that strives to “drive world-changing advances across the sciences and society."
Annabel Lemma, graduate student in chemical and biological engineering, has been selected as one of eight students to receive a 2018 Teaching Award from the Princeton University Graduate School.
Sujit Datta has been awarded a 2018 Faculty Research Award from the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) for his proposed work in collaboration with Maurizio Chiaramonte, assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering and associated PEI faculty member.
The National Science Foundation (NSF) announced its 2018 Graduate Research Fellowship Program awardees this week. Seven current and former students of chemical and biological engineering received awards.
Two graduate students in chemical and biological engineering, Victoria Lee and Wai Ling Cheung, received Honorific Fellowships from the Princeton University Graduate School this week.
Professor Lynn Loo will give the 29th Annual Julian C. Smith Lectureship at Cornell University, April 9-10, 2018. The distinguished lectureship is comprised of two lectures, both presented by Loo.

Scientists have recently learned how to use light to control specific groups of neurons to better understand the operation of the brain, a development that has transformed areas of neuroscience.

For more than a century, biologists ignored a fundamental question about how cells do the business of sorting molecules in a crowd. Then came Cliff Brangwynne, whose surprising work showed that certain proteins separate into globules much like droplets of vinegar suspended in oil.

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