In a study with implications for chronic infections, Princeton researchers have described multiple pathways that some bacteria use to tolerate normally lethal antibiotic treatments. The findings overturn common assumptions about antibiotics’ limited effectiveness against certain bacteria and could lead to better treatments.
A new device that purifies water relying only on sunlight could help produce clean drinking water at low cost and little environmental impact. When placed in contaminated water, the gel soaks up only pure water, leaving contaminants behind. When sunlight warms the gel, it change shapes and expels the water for collection.
The Graduate School has awarded Christopher A. Browne a Wallace Memorial Fellowship in Engineering, funding his Ph.D. work for the 2021-2022 academic year.
A new technology being developed by Princeton University researchers and alumni could offer a more effective and robust delivery method for COVID-19 vaccines.
Three technologies emerging from CBE that address some of society’s biggest challenges — from transparent solar cells to low-cost water purification — will receive support for research and development through Princeton’s Intellectual Property Accelerator Fund.
A team of Princeton researchers found they could coat a liquid elastic on the outside of a disc and spin it to form useful, complex patterns. When spun just right, tiny spindles rise from the material as it cures. The spindles grow as the disc accelerates, forming a soft solid that resembles hairs.

In research that may eventually help crops survive drought, scientists at Princeton University have uncovered a key reason that mixing material called hydrogels with soil has sometimes proven disappointing for farmers.

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has named Princeton postdoctoral researcher Sofia Quinodoz a 2020 Hanna Gray Fellow, bolstering her study into how the structures within cells contribute to disease.

As any cook knows, some liquids mix well with each other, but others do not.

Susan Leggett, a postdoctoral research associate in chemical and biological engineering, has received a two-year fellowship from the New Jersey Alliance for Clinical and Translational Science (NJ ACTS), supporting her research into an especially aggressive form of cancer and connecting her with a network of advanced researchers beyond Princeton.

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