Optimeos Life Sciences, a startup founded by two Princeton University faculty members, has reached agreements with six pharmaceutical companies to develop therapeutics using a Princeton-developed drug delivery technology. The partnerships have the potential to improve the effectiveness of medications for the treatment of diseases, ranging from...
Michael Webb has joined the Princeton faculty as an assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering, bringing expertise in modeling molecular interactions important to health and energy.
As the climate changes, drought is worsening across large swaths of the globe. To combat this, a team of Princeton researchers is looking to an unusual water source – the air. The team aims to use thermo-responsive hydrogels, or networks of polymers that are commonly used in biomedical applications, for water harvesting.
Combining light and a protein linked to cancer, researchers at Princeton University have created a biological switch to conduct an unprecedented exploration of cellular development in the embryo.
The Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, has appointed professor Sankaran Sundaresan as Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, citing the "global impact" of his research.
The National Science Foundation has granted Sujit Datta a CAREER Award, part of its Faculty Early Career Development Program that supports junior faculty who exhibit leadership as role models in education and research.
Yeast already helps make bread and beer and cranks out the biofuel ethanol, but scientists believe it can be used to create an even more efficient fuel called isobutanol. Normally, yeast only creates a tiny amount of isobutanol. Now researchers at Princeton University have discovered a genetic switch that significantly ramps up production.
In a development offering great promise for additive manufacturing, Princeton University researchers have created a method to precisely create droplets using a jet of liquid. The technique allows manufacturers to quickly generate drops of material, finely control their size and locate them within a 3D space.
A team from Princeton University and Ohio State University has been awarded a five-year, $3-million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to advance research on low-temperature plasmas.
Cracks in the desert floor appear random to the untrained eye, even beautifully so, but those patterns of dried clay turn out to be predictable—and useful in designing advanced materials.

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