Class Day celebrates graduates' curiosity and talents

Thursday, Jun 6, 2019
by John Sullivan

Dean Emily A. Carter opened the School of Engineering and Applied Science's 2019 class day ceremony by calling on graduates to apply the knowledge they gained at Princeton in service to society.

“We need you,” Carter, the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment, told students gathered in the Friend Center courtyard for the June 3 event. “This country needs every engineer and scientist to work on the problems that face the nation, and that face humanity and the planet.”

Carter said members of the faculty were truly impressed by the engineering Class of 2019. The class included 39 graduates of chemical and biological engineering. She said members of the class had participated in athletics, dance, musical and theatrical performances, had made scientific discoveries and novel technological advances and had served the University and wider community through volunteer work.

“You have done outstanding work during your time at Princeton,” she said.

Graduates sit with their families during the ceremony

Photo by Sameer Khan/Fotobuddy

Carter said graduates will go on to obtain graduate and professional degrees, work for the nation's most recognizable companies, play professional sports, teach, enter military service or start new companies. Members of the class have received honors including Fulbright Fellowships and National Science Foundation fellowships.

“I expect that you entered the school of engineering and applied science with a deep curiosity of how physical, living and information systems work,” Carter said. “I expect you are leaving not only with your curiosity intact but also with a confidence that you can put what you have learned here to good use for humanity and the planet.”

The winners of major awards at the 2019 Princeton Engineering Class Day were presented by Associate Dean for Undergraduate Affairs Peter Bogucki.

Emily de Jong, a chemical and biological engineering major with certificates in applications of computing and in applied and computational mathematics, was awarded the James Hayes-Edgar Palmer Prize in Engineering. de Jong is also the recipient of the Shapiro Prize for Academic Excellence and has been inducted into Phi Beta Kappa and Tau Beta Pi. For her thesis investigating how suspended colloidal particles pass through a porous medium, she developed a mathematical model of colloidal transport. She served as a course assistant in the math department and was principal bassoonist in the University Orchestra and vice president of the Cycling Club. De Jong, of Colleyville, TX, will pursue at Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at the California Institute of Technology.

Award winners with dean Emily Carter

The winners of all the major awards from the School of Engineering and Applied Science, with dean Emily Carter.

The complete list of winners of major awards is:

JAMES HAYES-EDGAR PALMER PRIZE IN ENGINEERING

Emily de Jong

Gavin Zhu

 

THE J. RICH STEERS AWARD

Alexander Hsia

Nyema Wesley

 

JEFFREY O. KEPHART '80 PRIZE IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS

Ryoto Sekine

 

THE TAU BETA PI PRIZE

Diego Fierros

 

THE JOSEPH CLIFTON ELGIN PRIZE

Amber Lin

Moyinoluwa Opeyemi

 

THE GEORGE J. MUELLER AWARD

Amanda Brown

Maximilian Véronneau

 

THE CALVIN DODD MACCRACKEN SENIOR THESIS/PROJECT AWARD

Emily Geyman

Mitchell Hallee

Gerry Wan

 

THE LORE VON JASKOWSKY MEMORIAL PRIZE

Coleman Merchant

Peter Russell