News: Energy and Environment

When bacteria spread through soil, tissues and other environments crammed with obstacles, keeping on the straight and narrow path leads to dead ends. Instead, bacteria move through open spaces until they get trapped, then reorient to hop through an opening to the next hole. A new model developed by Princeton researchers explains why this hop-and-...
Princeton researchers have solved a 54-year-old puzzle about why certain fluids strangely slow down under pressure when flowing through porous materials, such as soils and sedimentary rocks. The findings could help improve many important processes in energy, environmental, and industrial sectors from oil recovery to groundwater remediation.
Jonathan Conway, an expert in plant-microbe interactions, has joined the Princeton faculty as an assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering.

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