News

Filters

Brangwynne, pioneer in cell biology, awarded Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences
Clifford Brangwynne, a pioneer in the soft-matter physics of cells, has been awarded the 2020 Wiley Prize in Biomedical Sciences.
Researches chart new path to seeing disease at the molecular level
Everything a cell does, from dividing in two to migrating to a different part of the body, is controlled by enzymes that chemically modify other proteins in the cell. Researchers at Princeton University have devised a new mathematical technique to describe the behavior of many cellular enzymes. The approach, published February 13 in the journal Current Biology, will help researchers determine how genetic mutations change the behavior of these enzymes to cause a range of human diseases, including cancer.
Kevrekidis, expert in modeling complex systems, elected to National Academy of Engineering
Yannis G. Kevrekidis, the Pomeroy and Betty Perry Smith Professor of Engineering, emeritus, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering.
It’s all in the delivery — nanoparticle platform could transform medical treatments
Optimeos Life Sciences, a startup founded by two Princeton University faculty members, has reached agreements with six pharmaceutical companies to develop therapeutics using a Princeton-developed drug delivery technology. The partnerships have the potential to improve the effectiveness of medications for the treatment of diseases, ranging from cancer to diabetes.
Michael Webb joins Princeton, seeks better molecular models
Michael Webb has joined the Princeton faculty as an assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering, bringing expertise in modeling molecular interactions important to health and energy.
Effort to pull drinking water from the air wins environmental center's funding
As the climate changes, drought is worsening across large swaths of the globe. To combat this, a team of Princeton researchers is looking to an unusual water source – the air. The team aims to use thermo-responsive hydrogels, or networks of polymers that are commonly used in biomedical applications, for water harvesting.
Optical switch illuminates cells' development
Combining light and a protein linked to cancer, researchers at Princeton University have created a biological switch to conduct an unprecedented exploration of cellular development in the embryo.
Sundaresan's "global impact" leads to honorary appointment
The Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, has appointed professor Sankaran Sundaresan as Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, citing the "global impact" of his research.
Soft materials expert Datta receives NSF CAREER Award
The National Science Foundation has granted Sujit Datta a CAREER Award, part of its Faculty Early Career Development Program that supports junior faculty who exhibit leadership as role models in education and research.
How to make better biofuels? Convince yeast it's not starving
Yeast already helps make bread and beer and cranks out the biofuel ethanol, but scientists believe it can be used to create an even more efficient fuel called isobutanol. Normally, yeast only creates a tiny amount of isobutanol. Now researchers at Princeton University have discovered a genetic switch that significantly ramps up production.